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Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Plan | Non-Travel Energy

Minneapolis

This tool allows users to explore a city’s potential energy futures through an interactive diagram that shows forecasted city-wide greenhouse gas emissions from building energy consumption. Starting with historic baseline data and a business-as-usual forecast, users can set reduction goals and visualize the predicted impacts of reduction “wedges” that can be achieved through actions taken by residents, businesses, utilities, and local and state governments. Three reduction strategies that represent the impacts of existing policies are shown by default, including: Commercial/Industrial Energy Code Enforcement, Residential Energy Code Enforcement, and Planned Portfolio Mix Changes. To learn more, check out the methodology document. The tool only evaluates non-travel energy, which comprises 55% of statewide emissions. To comprehensively address city-wide emissions, local governments should also consider vehicle travel, air travel, waste, wastewater, and agricultural emissions.

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SELECT CITY

SET GOALS

Set greenhouse gas reduction goals for non-travel energy in your city.

Carbon neutral by 2040
Align city goal with Minnesota’s goals from the Next Generation Energy Act of 2007
Custom goals
BASELINE YEAR
NEAR-TERM LONG-TERM
GOAL YEAR

% REDUCTION

SELECT STRATEGIES

COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL EFFICIENCY

Energy Code Enforcement

New construction and renovation projects in Minnesota are required to comply with the Minnesota Energy Code. In 2015, Minnesota adopted the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), which identifies energy conservation requirements for building envelopes and systems and references ASHRAE 90.1-2010 as a compliance pathway. This strategy estimates the emissions savings from the increased energy efficiency of a building that complies with the current energy code as compared to a baseline building. To avoid double-counting with other strategies, renovations are not included within this strategy.

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Compliance Rate:

Stretch Energy Code

This strategy involves meeting more aggressive energy performance thresholds for new construction than required by the current Energy Code, with the goal of producing as much energy on-site as is used. This concept is called net-zero energy. Minnesota has implemented a unique example of a net-zero energy standard through a program called Sustainable Buildings 2030 (SB 2030), which sets stepped energy performance targets for new and renovated buildings that lead to net-zero energy building design by 2030. To avoid double-counting with other strategies, renovations are not included within this strategy.

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Implementation Period: to
 

Compliance Rate:

Building Retrofit

Commercial building retrofits are defined here as building envelope improvements that decrease the energy required for space conditioning due to reduced thermal transfer between the building interior and exterior. Retrofits can include wall and roof insulation, energy-efficient windows, and air sealing.

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Appliance, Equipment, and Fixture Efficiency

Existing commercial buildings can improve their energy efficiency by replacing mechanical equipment, lighting fixtures, and appliances.

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Participation Rate:

Efficient Building Operations

Low to no-cost improvements in energy efficiency can be achieved through building operations by optimizing temperature setpoints and setback schedules and conducting equipment maintenance and diagnostics. In addition to regular diagnostic tasks conducted by the building operator, efficient building operations may also include periodic re-commissioning, during which a certified professional will systematically identify and remedy energy wasting malfunctions.

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Behavior Change

Businesses and industries can reduce their energy consumption through actions such as using smart power strips and power management strategies to reduce plug loads, turning off lights and computers, using operable windows and blinds to control heat gain, and adjusting temperature setpoints. These actions can be supported through behavior change programs that are based on information, education, and/or social interaction. Examples of behavior change programs include real-time feedback, competitions, and strategic energy management led by an energy champion.

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RESIDENTIAL EFFICIENCY

Energy Code Enforcement

New construction and renovation projects in Minnesota are required to comply with the Minnesota Energy Code. In 2015, Minnesota adopted the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), which identifies energy conservation requirements for building envelopes and systems. This strategy estimates the emissions savings from the increased energy efficiency of a residential building that complies with the current energy code as compared to a baseline building. To avoid double-counting with other strategies, renovations are not included within this strategy.

ON
OFF
 
Implementation Period: to
 

Compliance Rate:

Stretch Energy Code

This strategy involves meeting more aggressive energy performance thresholds for new construction than required by the current Energy Code, with the goal of producing as much energy on-site as is used. This concept is called net-zero energy. Minnesota has implemented a unique example of a net-zero energy standard through a program called Sustainable Buildings 2030 (SB 2030), which sets stepped energy performance targets for new and renovated buildings that lead to net-zero energy building design by 2030. To avoid double-counting with other strategies, renovations are not included within this strategy.

ON
OFF
 
Implementation Period: to
 

Compliance Rate:

Retrofit/Weatherization

Home weatherization is defined here as building envelope improvements that decrease the energy required for space conditioning due to reduced heat transfer between the building interior and exterior. Weatherization methods can include wall and roof insulation, energy-efficient windows, and air sealing. Programs such as home energy audits can help homeowners identify and prioritize impactful envelope upgrades. This strategy applies to existing homes and does not include improvements to mechanical or electrical systems.

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Appliance, Equipment, and Fixture Efficiency

Existing residential buildings can improve their energy efficiency by replacing inefficient mechanical equipment, lighting fixtures, and appliances.

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Participation Rate:

Behavior Change

Residents can reduce their household energy consumption through actions such as turning off lights and computers, using operable windows and blinds to control heat gain, and adjusting temperature setpoints. These actions can be supported through behavior change programs that are based on information, education, and/or social interaction. Examples of behavior change programs include home energy reports that encourage conformation to social norms by comparing a household’s energy use to that of its neighbors, real-time feedback, and competitions.

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ELECTRIC GRID MIX

Planned Portfolio Mix Changes

Minnesota's Renewable Energy Standard requires electric utilities to procure at least 25% of their portfolio from renewable sources by 2025. This has resulted in a reduction in the electricity emissions factor during the baseline time period, and will continue to achieve reductions through 2025. In addition to these legislated savings, electric utilities impact their emissions factor through other portfolio management decisions, such as switching from coal-fired power plants to natural gas. This strategy is based on the projected emissions factors identified by electric utilities in their Integrated Resource Plans (IRPs).

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Increased Renewable Energy Standard (RES)

Emissions rate savings beyond those currently planned by electric utilities could be achieved through a more ambitious transition to renewable sources. This strategy is based on procuring 50% of the grid portfolio from renewable sources by 2030.

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Implementation Period: to

RENEWABLE ENERGY

On-Site Photovoltaics

Minnesota has a goal of meeting 1.5% of its annual electricity consumption through solar energy by 2020 and 10% by 2030. Building owners may elect to install photovoltaic panels on their roofs to reduce their electricity costs and carbon footprint. The generated electricity can either be used on site, which may require energy storage, or sold back to the grid. This strategy is dependent on the amount of viable rooftop area within the community that receives adequate solar energy.

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Rooftop Solar Resource (MWh):

Rooftop Utilization Rate:

Green Power Purchase – Commercial/Industrial

Commercial and industrial customers that purchase electricity from a utility company can participate in voluntary programs that allow them to purchase a portion of their electricity from renewable energy sources. In Minnesota, utility green tariff programs and community solar gardens (CSGs) are two options for consumers seeking to purchase renewable electricity.

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Green Power Purchase – Residential

Residential customers that purchase electricity from a utility company can participate in voluntary programs that allow them to purchase a portion of their electricity from renewable energy sources. In Minnesota, utility green tariff programs and community solar gardens (CSGs) are two options for consumers seeking to purchase renewable electricity.

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Participation Rate:

Business-As-Usual Emissions (//(chart.data.rows[chart.bottom_label].c[1].v) | number:0// tonnes CO2e) Action Plan (//(wedges.years.year_2040.total_reduction_co2/(chart.data.rows[chart.bottom_label].c[1].v))*100 | number:0//% reduction) Goal (//((((chart.data.rows[chart.bottom_label].c[1].v)-(chart.data.rows[chart.bottom_label].c[8].v))/(chart.data.rows[chart.bottom_label].c[1].v)))*100 | number:0//% reduction)
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